Dec 312014

LeloMona2If you at all frequent the world of sex toy review blogs (or even Reddit) you’d probably think that the Lelo Mona 2 is one of the three Holy Grail sex toys (the other two being the We-Vibe Tango and the Njoy Pure Wand). So you may be able to understand why I feel like the black sheep (oh wait, I am!) for not loving the Lelo Mona 2. I ask that you hear me out before you light the torches and brandish the pitchforks. I like it well enough; it’s okay. But I don’t long for it. In fact, I don’t ever use it….unless I’m writing a review.

“How can you not love the Mona 2?!?”

Since my body requires a ton of vibration strength for it to matter to my g-spot, the vibrations of the Mona 2 don’t quite cut it for me as an internal vibe. It’s good, don’t get me wrong, and it’s fairly strong, but I need something more…. more than most people. I need the serious rumbles, like those found in the L’amourose Rosa Rouge.  The vibrations of the Lelo Mona 2 are good enough to help stimulate my internal clitoris but not enough to really wake up my g-spot. It’s pretty good as an external vibe if you don’t like pinpoint vibrations, and want something with a handle, but it’s still not going to be my top recommendation. I actually can’t think of a situation where I’ve chosen the Mona over the We-Vibe Tango for external stimulation – I guess I prefer something more pinpoint (like the Tango). I find that using a vibe like the Lelo Mona 2 as an external stimulator during partnered PIV sex is a little less awkward because it gets my hand out of the way a bit, versus using the Tango, but the effort required for me to come using the Mona 2’s more broad stimulation isn’t worth the saved hassle.  Plus, after trying vibes like the Je Joue Uma, the half-plastic half-silicone design of the Mona 2 combined with the buttons makes clean-up a bit more of a hassle than I feel up for most times. Yes, I’m lazy. The Uma is totally encased in a silicone skin, and the buttons on the end are just a bit easier for me to access. 

Better than, Worse than

If we’re comparing Lelo to Lelo, I’d definitely pick the Mona 2 over the Gigi 2 any day.  Lelo Mona 2 provides the fullness I need with a longer overall design that I also really need. The vibrations of the Mona 2 are definitely stronger and better than the Gigi 2. While I do love everything about the L’amourose Rosa Rouge much more than the Lelo Mona 2, for those who need a lot of firm pressure on their g-spot, I’d recommend the Mona 2 (or Uma) over the Rosa Rouge. But if you want something easier to hold and with more powerful vibrations, I’d recommend the Rosa (or heated version, Rouge) any day. There is an increased cost there, of course. Je Joue’s Uma is about $20 less than Mona 2 and I feel the vibrations are just a bit more rumbly. 

Like most higher-end sex toys, Mona 2 is rechargeable, waterproof, has varied levels of vibration intensity and has a few pulsating settings. I’m never a fan of patterns, so I stick with the straight vibrations. There’s a warranty but experiences from fellow readers have shown that there’s a few issues with the Lelo customer claims department.  Unlike most newer rechargeable sex toys, though, the Lelo Mona 2 isn’t USB-rechargeable. This means you’ll have to purchase from a store in the country you live in, to ensure your charger is the right voltage and prongs and whatnot for you.  The silicone is a silky-smooth skin overtop a hard plastic vibrator, so there’s no give and no squish. If you need something softer and thinner, try the Tenga Iroha Minamo.

Want it?

As with all Lelo creations, Mona 2 is a bit pricey. As of this writing, sells it for $129.99. Every now and then you’ll be able to catch a Lelo sale or just an overall site sale to save a bit. So far, I’ve received fewer complaints about the Mona 2 failing than other Lelo items, but I’m skeptical overall on their brand. Of course, now that I’ve taken so long to write this review the Mona Wave is out. So now the big question will be  Mona 2 or Mona Wave? Stay tuned….a review on the Wave is coming shortly. 


All purchase links here go to Shevibe, the best retailer on earth. If, however, you’re in the UK you can grab it from LovehoneyUK.  And Canadians, check out Come As You Are

Oct 072014

Tenga Iroha MikazukiFor as much as I love the Tenga Iroha Minamo, I’m underwhelmed by the Iroha Mikazuki. The Iroha Minamo arrived first on my doorstep; I was so excited about it and liked it so much that I asked Tenga if I could review both. I wanted to be certain that I could recommend them interchangeably. I’m so glad I did because I am more reluctant to recommend the Mikazuki.

My first Iroha vibe was the Iroha Midori. I had expected a lot more squish and give than I experienced with the Midori and felt a bit let down but it all. The Minamo delivered on that squish, and how. But the Iroha Mikazuki goes back to being barely squishy. The tip is very squishy, like Vixskin heads, and this continues for about the first inch because there’s no plastic body underneath, it’s simply all soft material. But after that first inch it’s just not as soft. However, the Mikazuki is thinner than the Minamo and still could be a decent insertable vibe for those who are very new to penetration or have vaginismus. The slender shape starts out very slim, 0.75″ wide and gradually enlarges to a max width of 1.25″ at about 4.5″ of insertable length, or just below the buttons.

The color is hard to pinpoint, and photograph. The yellow is just a bit more yellow than it appeared onscreen to me. It’s not quite a banana yellow. It’s maybe a tad bit more than butter yellow. It perfectly matches the color of raw sweet bi-color corn on the cob. Yet in certain lighting it’s just….not an appealing yellow. I super appreciate this color deviation, but I foresee a lot of people possibly passing this up because of the less-than-popular color. Tenga is definitely one company totally ignoring the American gendering of colors, though, I’ll give em that. They’re also bucking the marketing standpoint. I’ve been told by more than one company that orange and yellow barely sell in sex toys.

The Iroha Mikazuki is very much like the Minamo in most ways; the charging, the vibration strength, the feel of the silicone skin, it’s waterproof, and flexible-ish. For some reason I thought at first that the Mikazuki would be a little *more* flexible than the Minamo, but it’s not. It’s the same, which is to say….not a whole lot. It’s nowhere NEAR as flexible as the photos from Iroha show on Shevibe

Tenga Iroha Mikazuki vs Minamo

All in all, my relative meh-ness on the Iroha Mikazuki can be attributed directly to the level of squish. If it had just a tiny bit more squish all over, then I would love it a lot more. The way it currently is, though, is underwhelming. I think the slender size and silkiness of the silicone is still great for the newbies, those who’ve not experienced vaginal penetration, those with medical issues and so on…..and of course the tip is very squishy, which could make for a very pleasant and comfortable clitoral/vulva vibrator. But for those who really want the comfort and forgiveness of soft and squish for an insertable vibe? I really need to recommend Minamo, instead. It might be slightly bigger, but that extra tiny amount of girth is all super-soft squish. .


I was give the Mikazuki in exchange for my honest review, courtesy of Tenga Iroha. You can find the Iroha Mikazuki at my favorite retailer, SheVibe.

Apr 102014

We-Vibe 4I’ve been reviewing the We-Vibe ever since it first came out, so it’s been interesting to watch the changes they’ve made over the years. The first We-Vibe was simple–no remote, no patterns–but lacking in vibration strength. We-Vibe 21 added in a bunch of patterns. We-Vibe 3 added in a remote and a bit of a power increase, along with an easier method of charging–the induction base–which also made it waterproof. So far though, We-Vibes 1 through 3 all looked about the same. Finally We-Vibe 4 is out and the changes are significant2. I admit that the We-Vibe has historically never had enough power for me, although I’ve read plenty of reviews from satisfied people. I’ve been hoping that one of these versions, the changes will be significant enough for me to finally love it as much as I want to. 

New Silicone–Finally!

We-Vibe 3 compared to We-Vibe 4. We-Vibe 3's remote had one button, We-Vibe 4's has 4 in a circle. The We-Vibe 3 is shown in a U shape with glossy silicone covered in dust, fur and other crap. The We-Vibe 4 is a much tighter U shape, shown to be relatively free of dust and fur. Previously, We-Vibe had used the shiny silicone that attracts dust/fur/lint like a magnet. You couldn’t keep it clean. The We-Vibe 4 features their new, silky-smooth matte finish silicone which stays clean! It’s much nicer during use, too, it glides against skin better. With the previous We-Vibes there was a drag to the silicone and much lube was required. Another aspect of the silicone that helps is that is isn’t so slippery anymore when wet with fluids or lube, which makes it much easier to press the button on the We-Vibe during use if you don’t have the remote handy.  In the photos below comparing the We-Vibe 3 and the We-Vibe 4, I purposely didn’t clean either one of them before taking pictures. I wanted to show you the drastic difference the silicone makes in how clean it stays. The We-Vibe 3 wasn’t hiding under the bed, as the fur and dust might suggest. I’d gotten the We-Vibe 3 out of storage two days before taking these photos. It sat on my desk for those two days.

New, Better Design

According to the site:

Clitoral stimulator  ~Curved to fit her body  ~Contoured to gently rest between the labia  ~Maintains contact to deliver deep, rumbling vibrations

Mid-section  ~Slim design allows for penetration  ~Snug fit for direct vibrations

G-spot stimulator  ~Shaped for stability  ~Rests in place behind the pelvic bone ~Comfortable for both partners

We-Vibe 4 features a more streamlined design, and the U-shape curve is also tighter. It gives a more snug fit which is beneficial if you’re wearing it solo and for public play, or just during PIV sex. The tighter curve combined with the new silicone and streamlined design makes it less likely to move around wildly during sex–but it can still move around a bit. We had a little bit of an issue with that in version 4, still3, but not as much as we did previous versions. I do vastly prefer the new, more snug fit. Even with my full, “chubby” outer labia it is comfortable. I completely surround the We-Vibe 4 but that’s fine. If your g-spot is located deeper inside the vagina, you might not love the redesign. For me personally it’s a better fit, though.

Another design change is the location of the power button. It’s always been a tiny button; the first We-Vibe was a switch rather than push-button which was even more difficult. And the button has always been located on the very tip–this means it would be buried in the labia, and made it difficult to turn on/off/change settings during use. But now, the button is slightly bigger and it’s moved back just enough from the tip so that everything is so much easier to use.

The We-Vibe 4 and 3 are shown to reveal the difference in the U shape The We-Vibe 4's g-spot portion is very different. The head is smaller and arrow-shaped, whereas the 3 was more tear-drop shaped. The 3 had more pronounced ridges. The 3 also got fatter closer to the middle, which could make it more uncomfortble during use with a partner that is more well-endowed.  Showing the back side of the g-spot arm, We-Vibe 4 is on the left We-Vibe 4 is on the left. You can clearly see the power button. The We-Vibe 3 power button is smaller and located at the front tip.

Still a Lack of Power

For whatever reasons, be it how I’m wired, how I’m built, dopamine levels….my external clitoris (and g-spot, for that matter) aren’t very sensitive. I require MORE. More power, sure, but more rumblies. If the We-Vibe had the same motor as the Tango–not the same power, it can be only as powerful as level 2 of 4 on the Tango otherwise it might overwhelm everyone–then the We-Vibe might be something I rave about.  Not even g-spot stimulation can make the vibrations of the We-Vibe 4 bring me to a clitoral orgasm during penetration. It can’t even do it solo. In fact I drained the charge one day trying in vain for 45 minutes to draw out even the tiniest of orgasms. It does have vibrations that are more rumbly than buzzy, but it just isn’t powerful enough for me. Currently even level 1 on the Tango is more powerful than the top level on the We-Vibe 4.

So, that’s it. If the We-Vibe 4 had the same motor as the Tango, we’d be in business. Of course I say that about many toys, because the Tango is my holy grail of vibrators, but surely the possibility exists for Standard Innovations to utilize that same motor? The bottom line here is that they’ve made some really great changes to the We-Vibe 4. Every change is necessary. Every change is good. But that one thing….the vibrations….keep me from being able to really recommend it to most. I think that if you’re more sensitive, you will really like it. We-Vibe does listen to customer feedback, as you can see with all the changes they’ve made.


My apologies to the RSS/Email only crowd. The following sections are made to be click-to-see on the site, to make this post less lengthy but you folks will see this no matter what. Since I feel that the opinion is the most important part of the review, that’s the focus. But some want to read more about how it functions, the specs, etc so if you click on each heading, you’ll see that info.


The We-Vibe 4 was provided to me for review by the manufacturer, Standard Innovations. You can buy directly from them, or from my favorite web store,

  1. Apparently they recently added a 2 Plus – it uses the same base-style charging as the 3 and 4, and has that tiny bit of a power boost over the 1 and 2
  2. The only odd thing is that We-Vibe still sells the 2, 2 Plus, 3 and now the 4. I don’t get that. Why have so many options? It’s very confusing. Offer a cheaper one, no remote, and one with the remote. Done and done. Get rid of 2, 2 plus and 3. Make the two options both just like the 4. There’s my advice, take it or leave it, Standard Innovations
  3. I think that is due to the size of my husband’s cock, it’s larger than average
Jun 112013

When you review a sex toy, do you talk price? Is it just me? I feel that it’s an important point to cover, one that my readers would want to know. If I were reading a sex toy review of an item priced well over $100, I would need a fuck ton of convincing that that item is going to rock my fucking world for that price.

A potential relationship with a retailer who thought I was new to the scene back in 2012 ended quickly when we discussed the finer points of reviewing. They didn’t want me to just review one item, they wanted me to review a lot. Primarily I turned them down because they didn’t have an affiliate program (I work from home now, I need all the income I can get) but also because our views just didn’t mesh.

I’m actually not going to publicly name names here, because the point I want to make really doesn’t have anything to do with the company – my point is that it’s an aspect I care about. But in our very short discussion, as a response to me detailing that I do not sugarcoat my reviews and I am bluntly honest, always, this was mentioned:

“It’s a product review… Let the customers decide if it’s worth it.  Most all of my product are over $100, so if that’s an issue and your readers don’t want to spend that, I don’t want to be skewered because you don’t believe in buying $150 toys.  If a toy is good, and gives orgasms, or does its job, give it a good review.  Let the buyer decide if it’s worth it.  I’m a high end retailer, and carry great products.  I need good, honest reviewers, that have good audiences that might buy.  Let me know what you think.  I repost on my blog, from your blog, word for word, so no editorializing or such.”

Well, I’ve already talked about my feelings on someone re-posting my review on their site and I was not okay with that aspect of their conditions. But I had a real head-scratcher over the “let the buyer decide if it’s worth it”. Um….isn’t that what I’m doing here?? I’m presenting them with the information but also my opinion. If they wanted pure information, they’d read the copy from the website. I responded with:

“I personally expect every, single luxury sex toy to live up to the high expectations that come along with a high price tag, and from everything I’ve seen, so do my readers. I’ve reviewed so many luxury toys that were such a let-down that I fear I’ve become a little jaded. I am hard on toys though; I expect great things for the price tag. I’ve been unable to fully recommend items such as some Lelo, Je Joue, Zini, JimmyJane, etc because there are less expensive items that perform better. In my opinion, I do reviews to help the buyer decide if a toy is worth the money – be it $25 or $125. I wasted a lot of my own money (both prior to reviewing and even recently) on toys that appeared to have glowing on-site reviews. That was what led me to reviewing, ultimately – I was searching for women who’d tried the toys I was considering, to ask them a few questions, and that was how I found out about blog reviewers. There are so many items out there that I don’t think are worth the price and I don’t hesitate to tell my readers that. To me, that’s half the point of a review. They’re looking for reassurance in our reviews, reassurance that they won’t be dropping a week’s worth of grocery money on a toy that just isn’t worth it. I get disappointed with items/manufacturers but in the end I actually like all the reviews I write – I love being able to tell someone that something is awesome and I feel good about telling someone to avoid something that sucks. I don’t gloss over just for sales. In the end, I want my readers to be happy with their purchase and feel that I truly helped them.”

This didn’t go over well, I guess. I never heard from the person again. Apparently, I’m not the type of reviewer they want on their side. They clearly wanted reviewers who would drive people to buy, and it almost seems like they were angling for some sugar-coating. Thus far all of the places I review for have never taken issue with my reviews, no matter how harsh they are and boy howdy have some1 been2 harsh3.

Do you talk about price? Do you feel the need to justify super-pricey toys to your readers, assuring them it is worth it? If that same toy that you feel is decent, but not wonderful, cost half the price would you be more likely to recommend it?

  1. Hello Touch, how I hate thee
  2. We-Vibe Thrill made me angry I wasted my money
  3. Fixsation review was so harsh, the creator tried to slam me in comments by pretending (badly) to be someone else
Jun 072013

Novelty disclaimer on a sex toy box

The sex toy industry is rife with half-truths, flat-out lies, confusing names for materials and more. When information is put out there that seems to make sense and seems credible, it gets passed on and shared until it’s viewed as fact. A prime example is that, for awhile, we all believed that a sex toy had to contain at least 10% silicone in order to be labeled as just merely “silicone” by the manufacturer (as if 10% silicone mixed with 90% PVC somehow makes it better….hint: it doesn’t) but I found out at CatalystCon’s Toxic Toys session in March that that isn’t true at all. In fact, they can claim whatever they want if they’re unethical. And some are.

noveltyImagine my surprise when an industry friend, who knows how much I love to write about things like this, tells me that the “Novelty” term is used mainly because of export and tariffs….NOT to create a legal loophole relieving them of responsibility if you get injured, or because they don’t care. True, I’m sure some companies don’t care. But the “Novelty” disclaimer isn’t 100% indicative of that. It does absolutely nothing to relieve the company of legal liability.

I’ve seen a shit ton of blame being laid on China and companies who use the “Novelty” disclaimer as to why there are so many “bad” sex toys. You’ll find many articles online that talk about toxic toys and they will also usually fall back on the “blame the novelty tag”. I did too, because when I first wrote my posts, I was calling on what I’d found. This is how it happens; I couldn’t find anything to the contrary, so I figured it must be true! It’s a confusing subject. The subject of this post is something I’ve been researching for literally months. I wanted to get as many ducks in a row as possible before writing, and see if I could really nail down facts and get back-up information to everything my friend below told me. And I couldn’t. I couldn’t get straight answers from many of the manufacturers. I’ll be sharing all of that in Part 2 but for now I’m working on the basic debunking.

My friend needs to remain anonymous because they have worked for a few manufacturers and by extension, retailers, in their time in the industry. This is what they had to say on the subject:

From a stand point of importing into the US, it has more to do with the cost of customs fees and duties and possible certifications that may be required depending on how it’s classified.  In regards to exporting products to other countries, each country has their own regulation in what they will accept on packaging or product descriptions.  Some companies have started omitting the words “for novelty use only” on the packaging, but my understanding is in those cases they are registered (not approved) with the FDA.


Everything is imported or exported under what’s called a Harmonized Tariff Schedule Code (Harmonized Code). This code determines the customs fees and duties that will be paid on every shipment coming in to this country and are based in part on 1) materials and 2) intended use. 


So basically, the bottom line is the wording that is chosen can effect the cost of the product when importing to the US and exporting to other countries.  In addition, if certain wording is used (ie. “toys” without the word “novelty”),  manufacturers face the possibility of needing additional certifications for the US & EU and the possibility of certain non-US countries denying shipment altogether. The only reason anyone tries to “skirt” the FDA is for customs fees, duties and taxes.  It has nothing to do with the quality of the product, but rather cost of importing. When importing to the US (and possibly exporting, depending on the country), if any products are labeled as “toys” (or NOT labeled as “For novelty use only/not intended as a medical device”) then they may be subject to  Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008“.

What about the legal loophole theory? I talked with K.M. Davis,  a lawyer who has worked with numerous adult industry companies. I asked: “DOES the disclaimer make any lawsuit null and void? What if a company claims their product is phthalates-free, but a customer gets a chemical burn from using it, sends it off to be lab-tested and finds a bunch of toxic chemicals. Can they sue?”

I can say, having worked with manufacturers in a number of industries, not just sex toys, that there is often a “what is everyone else doing, I better do that too” mentality among lawyers, insurance folks and manufacturers related to disclaimers. So, often one company ends up putting something on their packaging for no better reason than “everyone else was doing it.”


I have heard speculation among industry folks that the “novelty use” disclaimer is an attempt to avoid lawsuits if a consumer somehow injures themselves using the product (either because it is toxic or a bad design) and have heard others speculate that it is used to avoid potential prosecution if the products are sold somewhere where sex toys are banned or regulated. However, nothing can make a lawsuit null and void, as a judge is always free to say that despite a disclaimer, the manufacturer could reasonably have known what the consumer would use it for.


As to saying your product is free of something but not actually being free of that, because sex toys are completely unregulated, there’s really not much a consumer can do. One could sue if they tested something and found the claim untrue, but you’d have to prove what your personal damages were1. It’s unlikely anyone would want to pursue that claim either, which is what manufacturers rely on….

Here’s the tl;dr for Part 1:

1. They’re likely doing it because it’s just always been done, and the company lawyers are sticking with tradition.

2. You can still sue

3. It’s likely more for exporting reasons than anything else, for most companies – if it’s not “novelty”, then the FDA thinks it is medical and they will require formal approval, photos, and a 3-page paper written on the subject. In blood2.

So should you avoid all companies who use such disclaimers? What about the companies who don’t use the warning words? Come back for Part 2 next week!

  1. Meaning: If you suffered chemical burns, you’d have to hope that your doctor knows it’s a chemical burn and not try to treat it as an infection. You have to be upfront with your doctor. Then you’d have to get the funds for testing the sex toy from an accredited lab. Then find a lawyer, like Davis. It’ll be a years-long event, I’m sure
  2. I might be exaggerating a little…

Review: Minna Ola

 Reviews, Sex Toys  Comments Off on Review: Minna Ola
May 152013
Image courtesy of

Image courtesy of

The Minna Ola looks unremarkable at first. It has no extreme curve, no extreme girth. It’s your average silicone-covered vibrator. It’s not plush. It is waterproof though, and rechargeable (although recharging this is maddening). 

But as soon as you pick up the Ola, you’ll see the difference. A portion of the handle feels like an air cushion. It IS an air cushion. The Minna Ola is the vibrator for those who adore patterns and don’t need lots of vibration intensity. With Ola, you create your own pattern. 

When you first turn Ola on, the power button will blink and it will give a friendly little pulse of vibration, but nothing happens. Until you squeeze that neat little air pillow on the handle. The harder you squeeze, the more powerful the vibrations become. You can slowly ease off and create undulating waves of ascending and descending vibrations or you can beat out staccato drums to the tune of your favorite Ace of Base song. This is called “freeplay mode” where you can do as you please. The trick is to play around with it at first and see what you like, then push the second button which records. This is called “loop mode”. During loop mode you can do whatever you want; once you’re done, you press that special record button again to stop recording. 

I bought the Ola because I was curious about this technology. Where so many sex toy companies create variations on the same thing, this was unique and different. Except I forgot one thing: I hate patterns. I need strong, steady vibrations. I can tolerate patterns as a tease, if I’m in the mood for that, but in general I’m not. So yay….my loop consisted of nothing but me holding down the soft spot all the way to create the most powerful vibrations Ola can spit out, unrelenting, unchanging. I don’t think that was their point. 

The nice part about this is that you can use it in either mode; freestyle requires that you press on the soft spot the whole time. If you let up, it stops. Loop mode means you can just enjoy the pattern you created. The Ola is long enough to be considered an internal vibrator but I don’t feel that it’s strong enough, thick enough, or have enough of a g-spot curve/swell to it to be of any real interest to me. When the Ola is surrounded (i.e. inserted) the vibrations dampen, as many vibrators do (especially the rechargeable ones) but it dampens enough so that I consider it to be on the low end of moderate. The vibrations are also somewhere in the middle of rumbly and buzzy. They’re not super deep, but they’re not irritatingly shallow, surface-only vibrations either.  They can easily be described as pleasant. I feel that the Je Joue Uma’s vibrations are stronger and more pleasing to me, though, for an internal g-spot vibrator that is similar in size, shape and “luxury” level.

Minna OlaThe only aspect of the Minna Ola that left me with any sort of strong feelings is the charging. I effing hate it. In fact, it’s safe to say that I hate ALL magnetic chargers. Seriously folks, amp up the magnetism or use the jack plug style. I have to have the Ola and the charger sitting just so, or it won’t charge. It took me awhile to realize that the power button had to slowly pulse and stay that way – and it took a number of tries to get it to do that, otherwise it blinked and then went dead without charging. It’s supposed to take 3 hours to charge it fully from dead zero but that time frame will depend upon the charger maintaining perfect contact with the Ola the whole time. The pulsing light isn’t easy to see in a very well-lit room, either. 

All in all, it’s a nice looking package. It comes with the ubiquitous satin drawstring bag. Due to the power & “record” buttons being circles, they’ve kept up with the circle theme as part of their logo and design of the package. The box is a tube, the manual is a circle shape, etc. Oh and the charger? Like the We-Vibe chargers there is a wall plug that ends in a jack, and a tiny little base you plug the jack into and then it clicks onto the Ola magnetically. Lose that little base and you’re screwed. Minna actually has  reason for this though, as annoying as it may be. You’ll notice a tiny jack hole in the squeeze pad; it’s not for charging. Since that squeeze pad is filled with air, when you travel sometimes altitude/pressure changes can deflate the squeeze pad. Poke around the hole with the jack (stop snickering, dammit) and it’ll re-inflate. 


  1. Charger is a pain in the ass
  2. It’s easy to forget to turn it off if you’re using it in freestyle mode. As soon as you stop squeezing the pad, it stops vibrating. All times I tried it out, it died on me because I accidentally left it turned on.
  3. You can create the perfect pattern but it will go away as soon as you turn the loop mode off to take a break, or turn the power off altogether. I feel like if you went to all that trouble to create an awesome pattern, you shouldn’t have to do it again unless you wanted to. 

I can only recommend the Minna Ola to people who prefer patterns, or almost like patterns if only they were slightly different.  If you want something WOW for your g-spot, move on. If you need definitive vibration intensity, keep looking. It’s just all around…..moderate. Unremarkable except for the main event. The unique technology and the “luxury” trappings jack up the price though, this usually retails for around $160ish.  I found this vibe on my own, but I’d recommend that you pick it up at SheVibe if you think it can work for you.