Mar 192013
 

Before I even write anything about CatalystCon, I’m writing this post because I feel that this information is too important to wait.

We all were once ignorant about sex toys, because the truths were never talked about. Truth, fact and education is slowly being spread around in the hopes of a revolution. I’m playing the small part that I can, and sharing with you everything I learn. Many fellow bloggers know this now, but a lot of consumers do not so I will say this for the benefit of all: there are no regulations on sex toys. None. You have one method for safety, and that is to buy only toys made by a trusted company. But this whole unregulated thing goes far deeper down the rabbit hole than I realized. I learned so much at the Toxic Toys panel, and this post is about EDUCATION. Is it scary? Yes. Does that mean it should be covered up? No. Never. On this blog, I’m sorta like The South:

“I’m saying this is the South. And we’re proud of our crazy people. We don’t hide them up in the attic. We bring ‘em right down to the living room and show ‘em off. See, Phyllis, no one in the South ever asks if you have crazy people in your family. They just ask what side they’re on.”
— Julia Sugarbaker, “Designing Women”

I’m bringing this crazy, and scary, information out to the front porch, not just the living room, and giving it a cocktail. I’m waving the banner high and I’m asking that you read it, learn it, and make changes to keep yourself and others healthy. Because there are wonderful, safe sex toys out there: Silicone, Glass, Stainless Steel, even hard Plastic. And wood!

The 10% Myth

There is a “fact” that has widely been spread around between reviewers, blogs and social media, like a game of telephone to the point that we don’t even know its origins, that a sex toy need only contain a minimum of 10% in order to garner the use of the word “silicone” on the packaging. During the Toxic Toys panel at Catalyst, Metis and Jennifer of Smitten Kitten confirmed to us that the 10% thing isn’t even true. There is NO regulation, so why would there even be that? But really, regardless, whether there is 10% or 50% silicone, there is still a percentage of that item that is something like elastomer and is therefore porous to some degree; and while it’s not likely, it may even contain phthalates or heavy metals or VOCs. Might. If they can and do lie on the 100% silicone claim, what else are they lying about? Update: there is no “blending” of elastomers and silicone.

Bottom line: A company could have the manufacturing plant in China put “silicone” on the label when it’s far from silicone. Nothing and no one can stop them.

Except…for us. Consumers would have to file class-action lawsuits against a sex toy company who mislabels.  WE CAN START THE CHANGE.

April 8th: Edited to add: In research trying to find out what exactly is the bizarre material that Screaming O calls SEBS I happened upon my old review for their unfortunate Studio Line MakeUp Brush Vibrator, which was my first foray into the world of failed flame tests. On my review at EF, another reviewer noted that while I was panning S.O. for calling it plainly “silicone” when it is not, that she was told it was “SEBS”, I contacted Screaming O and received this response:

screamingOsebs

No, Screaming O, “our government” doesn’t say SHIT about sex toy material listings. You can see, then, how easily this myth got spread around.

Phthalates-Free! Really?

So if there are no regulations on the silicone thing, can they lie about the phthalates-free claim, too? YES. Nothing on that packaging has to hold a grain of truth. NO REGULATION. I asked because my Sex Nerd Spidey Senses went up a year or so ago when I was doing some work for a new sex toy retail site and saw that a lot of cheap, crap jelly, PVC, UR3, and Cyberskin sex toys made by the big companies all of a sudden were labeled as phthalates-free – simply because this had become the big buzz word that consumers were responding to. It is not the only toxic element that can be present, but it is the one getting all of the attention because phthalates are banned from children’s toys, dog chew toys, etc.

The Brand Thinks it is Silicone

It’s simply a fact of the industry that the vast majority of the sex toys are being made by a third-party plant in China because this is where it is the most affordable to do so. This is mostly true for vibrators, anything containing electronics, moving parts, etc. So the brands/companies go to China and find a plant and they agree on a material and formulation, etc. They can tell China that “Hey I do want this to actually be 100% silicone.”. The big companies are going for price point – a low one- so unless there is someone in the plant regulating and watching over the plant, that plant may not make the sex toy out of the exact same materials the subsequent times after buyer approval isn’t happening.

Phthalates are Not the Worst Thing Out There

Pigmentation can be an issue. The Danish did their big study on sex toys (Tantus Inc. kept a PDF of the study so that you can read it yourself). They took 16 random sex toys and analyzed them. Metis summed it up here:

In 2006 the Dutch EPA did a study where they randomly chose 16 adult toys from a store. Out of those 16 tested 3 had arsenic, 6 had antimony, 12 had lead and 7 had cadmium. Cadmium is a heavy metal. Every time you expose yourself to those toys your cadmium level increases. One of the cadmium toys had levels so high that the EU would have required a radioactive sticker on the product had it known this had been imported into the continent. So what was it? The radioactive sex toy was a Chinese made Slimline vibrator made of safe ABS. The issue wasn’t what the toy was made of but what it was pigmented with. This toy was yellow and cadmium was its pigment.

Should you avoid ALL yellow sex toys? I don’t know the answer. Cadmium is also used as a plastic softener, so it’s not necessarily tied to the color yellow. I also want to point out though that this big test was done in 2005. The sex toy industry has come a very long way in the last 8 years. I would be especially interested to see the same testing done again, now. 

So Now What

NOW how do we, as consumers, protect our bodies?

1. Call the Dildologists. After the writing of this post, a new organization as been formed to serve as an industry watchdog, who will raise money and independently acquire material validation from accredited labs through funding.

2. I can point you again to the flame test; while the test is not 100% utterly accurate and you can see different results for different types of silicone, I feel that it can serve as a pretty close litmus 90% of the time. You can perform this on a tiny little section near the handle, near a part that doesn’t touch your body and the results will be quick and obvious. If there is a different method that will be more reliable, I’ll tell you.

3. Here’s a weird test recommended by Ducky Doolittle, also part of the Toxic Toys panel: Lick it. Your lips are very sensitive. If your lips tingle, go numb, etc? Do not use that toy. Your mucus membranes absorb things so quickly, both the good and the bad. A mindframe of “It’s just a sex toy that I only use occasionally, and I just really prefer jelly!! But I don’t use it much, and it doesn’t burn me, so I’m fine!” is not going to keep you safe. A lot of bad things in cheap sex toys won’t give you a clear cut reaction, but can indeed slowly cause damage to your body that you don’t even know about until it’s too late and no one will be able to pinpoint it.

4. Educate yourself, and others. After the writing of this post, I created a landing page for all things about sex toy material safety. Read it. Share stuff from it whenever you can. The more people we can educate, the better. Get them to throw out their shitty toys and pledge to only purchase safe materials from reputable companies.

I think you might be reading this and freaking out. I don’t want you to stop using sex toys. Just be careful on which manufacturers you buy from – on this page I have listed out the brands that I’ve researched and found to be reputable. That isn’t to say that each one makes only non-porous toys but I believe that, as an example, Evolved, is  trustworthy that their porous TPR toys are still non-toxic. If this changes, I’ll let you know. If you get a sex toy that has an odor? Ask the manufacturer/brand. Call them out on it (Consider the packaging, sometimes a smell can be from the packaging – if so, the smell will dissipate after separating it from the packaging for a few days).  Also keep an eye on the Coalition Against Toxic Toys for their recommendations and to Dildology as they begin to build their catalog of results.

This isn’t the end, the information here isn’t finite. Things are changing, education is being passed around, and reporting will continue to happen. I will keep writing. I want you all to do your research and keep writing. Take off your blogger hat sometimes and put on your journalist hat. YOU CAN DO IT! We can be the revolution, we can be the change.

 

  • https://bextalkssex.com Bex

    Thank you for posting this and for always being a resource for toy safety! It’s terrible the lack of regulation this industry has and all because of the shame people have surrounding sexuality in this culture. We need more people like you fighting to bring this to light!

  • http://incendiaire-reviews.blogspot.com Incendiaire

    Great post, really interesting to read.

    I’m always slightly suspicious these days whenever a product simply says “silicone” on the packaging, rather than “100% platinum silicone.” I’ve noticed that “silicone” toys from a couple of brands have a slightly different feel to them than what I’m accustomed to, as well as faint odour, and invariably they’ve been made in China. I should probably attempt a flame test at some point to put my curiosity to rest.

    The point about Chinese manufacturing is very true; I once knew someone who worked for a company which was looking to have a stainless steel product made in a Chinese factory, and he had specific requirements for the amount of chromium it had to contain. When it came time to negotiate the price he asked if it could be produced more cheaply, and the man who ran the factory straight up told him that he could do it for less, but the result would be that they’d just use less chromium. It would seem that substituting materials and cutting corners to save costs is a pretty standard practice in Chinese factories, unless you have someone there to constantly breathe down their necks.

    ~I have experienced nearly a dozen different “feels” of true silicone. Lots of factors at work there.

  • http://loraxofsex.com Lorax Of Sex

    Thank you for not making this post the “all phthalates all the time” post. I’ve been rattling the cage about VOCs, heavy metals, and other inclusions for a while and it looks like things are finally shaking loose from that.

    ~I would like to write a joint post with you perhaps, about the VOCs.

  • http://www.NakedAtOurAge.com Joan Price

    Thank you for writing the article I wanted to write! May I quote from it on my blog (http://www.NakedAtOurAge.com) and send people here for the rest? I admire you for writing this so well and so quickly after CatalystCon!

  • http://www.blacklabelsextoys.com.au Sarah

    Thanks you for writing this. It’s an on-going issue that will continue unless we continue to highlight it to the manufacturers and continue to educate consumers. The EPA study is fascinating but frightening reading!

  • Gabryella

    “whether there is 10% or 50% silicone, there is still a percentage of that item that is something like elastomer and is therefore porous to some degree; and while it’s not likely, it may even contain phthalates or heavy metals or VOCs. Might. If they can and do lie on the 100% silicone claim, what else are they lying about?”

    OK. Remember when Egyptian cotton was all the rage a number of years ago? And many towels came out saying 100% pure Egyptian cotton? While there was only a couple threads through the towel that were actually Egyptian cotton, but those threads were 100% pure Egyptian cotton. I’m not saying this to argue, I am only saying this from a marketing standpoint. They aren’t lying if they use even .01% pure silicone and claim a product to be, “100% pure silicone” as that .01% of the total product is indeed quality silicone. And those companies who just slap 100% pure silicone on the package without a shred of silicone in their toy, they indeed are lying.

    I find all packages misleading, and that is what has to be regulated all across the board.

    And bottom line; no matter what anyone says, the sex toy industry needs regulations. And I would never in my life suggest that any American run body do the regulations. I would hope that it would be a European company.

    ~ “They aren’t lying if they use even .01% pure silicone and claim a product to be, “100% pure silicone” as that .01% of the total product is indeed quality silicone.” That is employing technicality loophole logic that I don’t think even works. No, if they say something is 100% silicone, then if there is anything in there other than silicone…..it is a lie. Plain and simple. There’s no qualifiers given like in other marketing worlds. No fine print.

  • pamela

    I have worked on the manufacturing side of sex toys for almost 8 years and although I’ve seen many positive changes take place over that time, we still have a long way to go. Your point about a manufacturer sincerely believing that what they are bringing to market is of a certain specification is unfortunately, very true. A company will start out with certain specs and over a short period of time (sometimes months), if standards are not maintained by the manufacturer, the factory begins to cut corners. This can take place in the quality of materials for the actual product or even down to the thickness of the packaging. If a factory can save 1 or 2 CENTS per toy, in the overall scheme of things, it is a big deal. And although it’s true that there we are in an unregulated industry here in the US, most companies worth their salt have adopted procedures that adhere to EU standards because toys that are manufactured in Asia are not intended to just sell in the US, and unless they have proof of compliance, they can not be sold in the EU. Two of these certifications are RoHS (Restrictive use of Hazardous Substances) and CE (you may have noticed the CE stamp on devices containing electronics). Testing should be from a reputable third party, but like everything, this is not always the case. Again, it is up to the manufacturer to take certain steps to ensure the safety and legitimacy of their products, just like it is up to the retailer or consumer to demand proof of safety. It amazes me how often I come across retailers, educators and even reviewers and /or bloggers who are sadly, misinformed (not you! ;) There are quite a few reputable sex toy manufacturers out there and on the flip side, there are quite a few sex toy manufacturers that are thought of as reputable that are in fact, far from it.

  • pamela

    “I’m always slightly suspicious these days whenever a product simply says “silicone” on the packaging, rather than “100% platinum silicone.” I’ve noticed that “silicone” toys from a couple of brands have a slightly different feel to them than what I’m accustomed to, as well as faint odour, and invariably they’ve been made in China. I should probably attempt a flame test at some point to put my curiosity to rest.”

    A flame test is a very good way to test for impurities. However, be aware that the reason there are different “feels” to silicone, can usually be attributed to whether or not the product is coated. One such popular coating on a majority of “luxury” silicone sex toys is something called a PU (Polyurethane) coating. There are other coatings, but this is the one most widely used. A company can make a statement that they use 100% platinum silicone, but fail to mention that it is coated in PU. Would you say they are not being truthful, if indeed they use 100% platinum silicone? The fact that the product is made in China is of little or no consequence if the manufacturer is maintaining quality standards.

  • http://dangerouslilly.com Lilly

    I thought they were coated in SST (Silicone Soft Touch) which is listed as a silicone body-safe product?

  • pamela

    “I thought they were coated in SST (Silicone Soft Touch) which is listed as a silicone body-safe product?”

    Yes, there are other coatings. I encourage anyone not to assume, but rather ask questions of the manufacturer. There are still many companies that are using PU.

  • http://www.marvelous-darling.com Sarah @ MarvelousDarling

    Can I just tell you how fucking excited I am that you somehow brought a Designing Women reference that’s near and dear to my heart into a blog post about sex toy safety? God I love you!

  • http://karasutrareviews.com Kara_Sutra

    Good on you for posting this!! There is way too much misinformation, mislabeling, and out right lying go on within the industry as it stands, and has been for DECADES. I really do hope everyone reads this. That it gets the attention it deserves and that you get the credit you deserve for posting it.

  • http://hypatiaofvermont.com Samuel

    I’ve heard (from sources that I would not think of as knowledgeable by any means) that for questionable toys a good idea is to slip a condom over it before insertion (although this obviously only makes sense if it’s a toy that a condom goes on.) Have you heard anything along these lines?

    ~Condom use on a suspect toy is for two reasons: First, these suspect toys are most often going to be porous. Porous is bad. It harbors bacteria/mold, and should never be used between two people or between anus and vagina. But condom usage to prevent the bad chemicals from leaching out? Jury is still out. Tests haven’t been performed. Some have reported that it helps, that they don’t feel the burning, others report that they still feel the burning/itch if they’re sensitive.

  • hispreciouspet

    Thanks for the information!

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